David B Mechem


David Mechem
  • Professor
  • Chair

Contact Info

Department Phone:
Lindley Hall, room #230
University of Kansas
1475 Jayhawk Blvd
Lawrence, KS 66045-7594

Biography

I am a professor in the Atmospheric Science Program located in the Department of Geography. My group and I conduct research on cloud microphysics and dynamics, and mesoscale organization of cloud systems.

I teach the 2-semester undergraduate dynamic meteorology sequence, physical meteorology (occasionally), and a graduate-level numerical modeling course.

Research

My research explores different manifestations of precipitating convection, ranging from drizzling boundary layer stratocumulus to deep, highly organized mesoscale convective systems. A common thread of interest between these phenomena is the concept of mesoscale organization and its role in promoting scale interactions, in particular how mesoscale and cloud-scale processes serve as upscale agents of change for the large-scale flow or cloud coverage. Guided by observational results, I employ large eddy simulation, cloud resolving models, and mesoscale models to investigate cloud system processes.

Selected Publications

McMichael, Lucas A, David B Mechem, Shouping Wang, Qing Wang, Yefim L Kogan, and João Teixeria. 2019. “Assessing the Mechanisms Governing the Daytime Evolution of Marine Stratocumulus Using Large-Eddy Simulation.” Journal Articles. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society 145: 845–866.
Yuter, S. E., J. D. Hader, M. A. Miller, and D. B. Mechem. 2018. “Abrupt Cloud Clearing of Marine Stratocumulus in the Subtropical Southeast Atlantic.” Journal Articles. Science 361: 697–701.
Mechem, David B., and Scott E. Giangrande. 2018. “Controls on Cloud Properties and Precipitation Onset for a Case of Cumulus Congestus Sampled during MC3E.” Journal Articles. Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres 123. https://doi.org/10.1002/2017JD027457.
Nelson, Kevin J.., David B. Mechem, and Yefim L. Kogan. 2016. “Evaluation of Warm-Rain Microphysical Parameterizations in Mesoscale Simulations of the Cloudy Marine Boundary Layer.” Journal Articles 144 (May): 2134–54.